Last edited by Dozuru
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

3 edition of Pension reform in Europe in the 90ś and lessons for Latin America found in the catalog.

Pension reform in Europe in the 90ś and lessons for Latin America

by M. Louise Fox

  • 84 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Naciones Unidas, CEPAL/ECLAC, Special Studies Unit, Executive Secretariat Office in Santiago, Chile .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Old age pensions -- Europe,
  • Old age pensions -- Latin America,
  • Social security -- Europe,
  • Social security -- Latin America

  • Edition Notes

    StatementLouise Fox, Edward Palmer
    SeriesSerie Financiamiento del desarrollo -- 114
    ContributionsPalmer, Edward E., 1945-, United Nations. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean. Special Studies Unit, Joint ECLAC/GTZ "Pension fund and Old Age Provisions"
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHD7105.35.E85 F69 2001
    The Physical Object
    Pagination42 p. :
    Number of Pages42
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15352108M
    ISBN 109211213274

    characteristics of the Western European nations and is also influencing the pension reform in Latin America and China, as proponents of world system and dependency theories have pointed out repeatedly (Wallerstein ). Culture is one important domain where the Pathway of Latin America and China differs from the Western Pathway (Figure 1).   Roncada, A. L. C. (). Reforming old age pension systems in developed cou tries: Lessons from Latin America. Brazilian Journal of Political Economy Vol Sinha, T. () Pension Reform in Latin America and Its Lessons for International Policymakers. Springer publisher, p. Uthoff, A. ().

    This chapter begins with a brief discussion of the introduction of a state-sponsored pay-as-you-go (PAYGO) pension system in Germany over a century ago, and pension reform in Latin American countries. It then considers the shift in the process of pension reform in organizations such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, and countries such as Chile, . The Chile pension system (Spanish: Sistema Previsional) refers to old-age, disability and survivor pensions for workers in pension system was changed by José Piñera, during Augusto Pinochet's dictatorship, on November 4, from a PAYGO-system to a fully funded capitalization system run by private sector pension critics and supporters see the reform .

      Second, Latin America’s political systems have difficulty dealing with the long-lived nature of pensions. Projecting a deficit in a PAYG system 10 or 20 years hence is a weak incentive to induce. This book moves beyond technical studies of pension systems by addressing the political economy of pension reform in different contexts. It provides insights into key issues related to pension policy and its developmental implications, drawing on selected country studies in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Latin America.


Share this book
You might also like
Oriental magic

Oriental magic

Report of the New Jersey state agricultural experiment station upon the mosquitoes occurring within the state

Report of the New Jersey state agricultural experiment station upon the mosquitoes occurring within the state

Tax benefits for older Americans.

Tax benefits for older Americans.

A Lonely Kind of War

A Lonely Kind of War

American government in Christian perspective

American government in Christian perspective

National Health

National Health

Shrewsbury

Shrewsbury

Treasure the word

Treasure the word

far side of the world

far side of the world

Castles in Spain

Castles in Spain

Occupational Safety and Health

Occupational Safety and Health

Classical Sinhalese sculpture c.300 B.C. to A.D. 1000

Classical Sinhalese sculpture c.300 B.C. to A.D. 1000

vegetation of the Lake Michigan shoreline in Wisconsin

vegetation of the Lake Michigan shoreline in Wisconsin

PLATONIS OPERA OMNIA V10 (Ancient Philosophy)

PLATONIS OPERA OMNIA V10 (Ancient Philosophy)

U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards

U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards

Pension reform in Europe in the 90ś and lessons for Latin America by M. Louise Fox Download PDF EPUB FB2

Pension reform in Europe in the 90ś and lessons for Latin America. Santiago, Chile: Naciones Unidas, CEPAL/ECLAC, Special Studies Unit, Executive Secretariat Office, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, International government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors.

Latin American experiments with pension reform began when Chile converted its public pay-as-you-go system to a system of private individual accounts in the early s. Several other Latin American countries then followed suit, inspired both by Chile’s reforms and by World Bank recommendations stressing compulsory government-mandated.

Pension reform in Europe in the 90's and lessons for Latin America. while this has not been possible in Latin America. Pension systems in Latin America face some of the same problems that Europe's social security systems have faced before but with more difficult financing conditions.

This document focuses on the lessons that Latin American Author: M. Louise Fox and Edward Palmer. In order to enhance fiscal sustainability, while maintaining adequate pension income, most EU Member States have carried out gradual and substantial pension reforms over the last decades.

The intensity of pension reforms has been particularly strong since These reforms generally comprised a wide range of measures. Latin American experiments with pension reform began when Chile converted its public pay-as-you-go system to a system of private individual accounts in the early s.

Several other Latin American countries then followed suit, inspired both by Chile's reforms and by World Bank recommendations stressing compulsory government-mandated individual saving accounts. Pension Reform in Latin America and Its Lessons for International Policymakers analyzes in detail these important questions.

The book begins with a detailed account of economic conditions in Latin America. It then discusses various models that policymakers rely on. For instance, pension benefits in Latin America are often based on earnings during the last few years of working life, which means those with steeper age-earnings profiles benefit the most.

Since men have steeper profiles than women, they pay contributions on relatively lower wages in their earlier years, and receive lifetime benefits based on. On similarities and differences of Latin America's reformed pension systems along a number of specific rules and issues, see especially Stephen Kay and Barbara Kritzer, “Social Security in Latin America: Recent Reforms and Challenges,” Economic Review (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta) 86 (first quarter ); Devesa-Carpio, Jose and Vidal.

Old-Age Income Support in the 21st Century attempts to explain current policy thinking and update the World Bank’s perspective on pension reform. The Bank has been involved in pension reforms in nearly 60 countries, and the demand for its support continues to grow.

“ The Hungarian Pension Reform: A Preliminary Assessment of the First Years of Implementation,” in Social Security Pension Reform in Europe, Feldstein, Martin and Siebert, Horst, eds. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press for National Bureau of Economic Research. Enter the counter-reform, starting inwhereby 14 Latin American and Caribbean countries rolled back private-sector insurance programs and deepened government involvement.

Each side has its. Pension Reform: Lessons From Latin America Monika Queisser* Abstract * There are benefits from Latin American pension reform, but they have been overestimated. * The approaches taken in second-generation reforms and their still early results hold lessons for OECD and non-OECD countries alike.

The pension system reflects the quality of our economic systems, our governments, and our social covenants.

The countries of Latin America have made progress in recent years in improving their pension systems, but they are still facing great challenges in this regard.

this road, both in Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe (Box 1). Box 1. Pension reform: The demonstration effect of Chile The arrangements in Chile were highly influential in Latin America and elsewhere. Beginning in the s, Peru (), Argentina (), Colombia (), Uruguay (), Bolivia (), Mexico.

the pension system reforms in Latin America during the past decades. As is known, the countries made valiant efforts to confront the collapse of many of their old pension systems and executed the reforms with attention to the social, economic and demo.

CAMILA ARZA, Pension Reform in Latin America: Distributional Principles, Inequalities and Alternative Policy Options, Journal of Latin American Studies, /SX, 40, 1, (), ().

First published inthis volume initially focused on Chilean pension reform, on which the author has published elsewhere, before moving onto Latin America more widely, with coverage extending from to the reform in Costa Rica and the Mexican pension reform.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

PENSION REFORM IN LATIN AMERICA INTRODUCTION Most formal pension systems worldwide are publicly managed. They pay defined benefits and depend on taxing a portion of worker's earnings. The pension systems are financed by payroll taxes on a pay-as-you-go (PAYG) basis.

Today's workers are taxed to pay the pensions of those who have already. Latin America has proven to be the most dynamic and innovative region in the area of pension reform.

More than a decade after Chile moved from a public pay-as-you-go to a private funded pension system, seven more countries in Latin America have reformed their pension systems. No two of these “second. A quarter of a century since Chilean-style pension reforms swept Latin America, the state of the region’s pension systems is worrisome.

Old and new problems are rearing their ugly heads, some.Latin America is growing older. Since the s, the number of people 60 years and older is increasing in the region as longevity is expanding.

For many decades, the largest portion of the population was younger t but with the aging process, the size of that group has been declining. On the other hand, those in the middle—15 to 59 years, the “productive” segment of .PENSION NOTES No.

34 - March Mercer Global Pensions Index: Lessons for Latin America Executive Summary The Mercer Global Pensions Index assesses the pension systems of 34 countries, revealing that Latin America has significant challenges in this area.

Chile ranks eighth among the best countries in the world, with.